Propositions & Corollaries

A college student with a love for learning and a yearning for escape.

So I had a ton of coffee and tea earlier and also took a nap so it’s 2:31am and I’m super awake so I’m just sitting on my couch with a block of cheese and a cheese slicer browsing the internet

What is happening to my life

swedenized:

Gamla Stan, december 2007 by swedenized

Reblogged from swedenized

swedenized:

Gamla Stan, december 2007 by swedenized

Reblogged from summer-well

fouriestseries:

Signal Collection and Parabolic Reflectors

reflector is a type of antenna that receives and focuses various types of signals. Reflectors have numerous applications, from satellite dishes and telescopes, to long-distance microphones and car headlights. One common feature of these examples is their parabolic shape, giving them the name parabolic reflectors.

It turns out that paraboloids are the perfect shape for focusing signals from distant sources. When pointed directly at the the incoming signal, a parabolic reflector (GIF 1) collects the signal to a single focal point, where a receiver, called a feed horn, is placed to collect the focused transmission.

In many applications, parabolic reflectors are too costly to produce, so spherical reflectors (GIF 2) are used instead. The disadvantage of spherical reflectors is that they have multiple focal points, and therefore produce blurry results.

Mathematica code posted here.

This code is incredibly messy and I guarantee there’s a better way to calculate this. Please contact me if you have suggestions!

Reblogged from acodetojoy

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

(Source: whimsy-cat)

everydaysweden:

A man rides a spectacular bike in Gothenburg.

Reblogged from swedenized

everydaysweden:

A man rides a spectacular bike in Gothenburg.

"A lot of parents will do anything for their kids - except let them be themselves."

Reblogged from onlinecounsellingcollege

Bansky (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

fotojournalismus:

A refugee woman from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, sits with a child inside a tent at Nowruz refugee camp in Qamishli, northeastern Syria on August 17, 2014. (Rodi Said/Reuters)

Reblogged from fotojournalismus

fotojournalismus:

A refugee woman from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, sits with a child inside a tent at Nowruz refugee camp in Qamishli, northeastern Syria on August 17, 2014. (Rodi Said/Reuters)

mapsontheweb:

Distribution of Semitic languages in the 1st century

Reblogged from polyglotted

mapsontheweb:

Distribution of Semitic languages in the 1st century

(Source: Wikipedia)

"

How do girls and boys develop these different views? Most likely, it has to do with the kinds of feedback we get from parents and teachers as young children. Girls, who develop self-control earlier and are better able to follow instructions, are often praised for their “goodness.” When we do well in school, we are told that we are “so smart,” “so clever, ” or ” such a good student.” This kind of praise implies that traits like smartness, cleverness, and goodness are qualities you either have or you don’t.

Boys, on the other hand, are a handful. Just trying to get boys to sit still and pay attention is a real challenge for any parent or teacher. As a result, boys are given a lot more feedback that emphasizes effort (e.g., “If you would just pay attention you could learn this,” “If you would just try a little harder you could get it right.”) The net result: When learning something new is truly difficult, girls take it as sign that they aren’t “good” and “smart”, and boys take it as a sign to pay attention and try harder.

We continue to carry these beliefs, often unconsciously, around with us throughout our lives. And because bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena, and give up way too soon.

"

Reblogged from adjectivelyamber

Psychology Today, The Trouble With Bright Girls (via fortinbrasftw)

woodendreams:

Lake Cauma, Switzerland (by Raphael Messmer)

Reblogged from woodendreams

woodendreams:

Lake Cauma, Switzerland (by Raphael Messmer)

Reblogged from singingmyscreamsong

(Source: annavonsyfert)

"Maybe it’s just in America, but it seems that if you’re passionate about something, it freaks people out. You’re considered bizarre or eccentric. To me, it just means you know who you are."

Reblogged from decadentscience

Tim Burton (via bettychantel)

Sadly it seems to be like that around the world.

(via sci-universe)

fotojournalismus:

Afghan refugee girls listen to their teacher at a mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Aug. 11, 2014. (Muhammed Muheisen/AP)

Reblogged from fotojournalismus

fotojournalismus:

Afghan refugee girls listen to their teacher at a mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Aug. 11, 2014. (Muhammed Muheisen/AP)

Reblogged from feelthefearanddoitanyway-x

(Source: fitnesstipsonly)

woodendreams:

Takachiho Gorge, Japan (by sonotoki)

Reblogged from woodendreams

woodendreams:

Takachiho Gorge, Japan (by sonotoki)