Propositions & Corollaries

A college student with a love for learning and a yearning for escape.

fotojournalismus:

A refugee woman from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, sits with a child inside a tent at Nowruz refugee camp in Qamishli, northeastern Syria on August 17, 2014. (Rodi Said/Reuters)

Reblogged from fotojournalismus

fotojournalismus:

A refugee woman from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, sits with a child inside a tent at Nowruz refugee camp in Qamishli, northeastern Syria on August 17, 2014. (Rodi Said/Reuters)

mapsontheweb:

Distribution of Semitic languages in the 1st century

Reblogged from polyglotted

mapsontheweb:

Distribution of Semitic languages in the 1st century

(Source: Wikipedia)

"

How do girls and boys develop these different views? Most likely, it has to do with the kinds of feedback we get from parents and teachers as young children. Girls, who develop self-control earlier and are better able to follow instructions, are often praised for their “goodness.” When we do well in school, we are told that we are “so smart,” “so clever, ” or ” such a good student.” This kind of praise implies that traits like smartness, cleverness, and goodness are qualities you either have or you don’t.

Boys, on the other hand, are a handful. Just trying to get boys to sit still and pay attention is a real challenge for any parent or teacher. As a result, boys are given a lot more feedback that emphasizes effort (e.g., “If you would just pay attention you could learn this,” “If you would just try a little harder you could get it right.”) The net result: When learning something new is truly difficult, girls take it as sign that they aren’t “good” and “smart”, and boys take it as a sign to pay attention and try harder.

We continue to carry these beliefs, often unconsciously, around with us throughout our lives. And because bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena, and give up way too soon.

"

Reblogged from adjectivelyamber

Psychology Today, The Trouble With Bright Girls (via fortinbrasftw)

woodendreams:

Lake Cauma, Switzerland (by Raphael Messmer)

Reblogged from woodendreams

woodendreams:

Lake Cauma, Switzerland (by Raphael Messmer)

Reblogged from singingmyscreamsong

(Source: annavonsyfert)

"Maybe it’s just in America, but it seems that if you’re passionate about something, it freaks people out. You’re considered bizarre or eccentric. To me, it just means you know who you are."

Reblogged from decadentscience

Tim Burton (via bettychantel)

Sadly it seems to be like that around the world.

(via sci-universe)

fotojournalismus:

Afghan refugee girls listen to their teacher at a mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Aug. 11, 2014. (Muhammed Muheisen/AP)

Reblogged from fotojournalismus

fotojournalismus:

Afghan refugee girls listen to their teacher at a mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan on Aug. 11, 2014. (Muhammed Muheisen/AP)

Reblogged from feelthefearanddoitanyway-x

(Source: fitnesstipsonly)

woodendreams:

Takachiho Gorge, Japan (by sonotoki)

Reblogged from woodendreams

woodendreams:

Takachiho Gorge, Japan (by sonotoki)

humansofnewyork:

Seen in Sweimeh, Jordan

Reblogged from humansofnewyork

humansofnewyork:

Seen in Sweimeh, Jordan

"Lucky people generate good fortune via four basic principles. They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities, make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition, create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations, and adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good."

Reblogged from explore-blog

Findings from research psychologist Richard Wiseman, author of The Luck Factor, who also asked a sample pool of volunteers to spend a month applying these four principles and found that 80% emerged “happier, more satisfied with their lives and, perhaps most important of all, luckier.”

Pair with how to make your own luck.

(via explore-blog)

Reblogged from psychpuppiesandpositivity

(Source: tyutan)

Reblogged from likeafieldmouse

likeafieldmouse:

The Lobed-tooth Crabeater Seal

"The mouth of a crabeater seal is uniquely adapted to feed on Antarctic krill by acting like a sieve. A hungry crabeater will take a mouthful of water, close its jaws, squeeze the water out through its teeth and filter out all the krill, which it then consumes.These microscopic krill comprise over 90% of the crabeater seal’s diet (despite its name, the crabeater seal does not actually feed on crabs).”

Reblogged from treeporn

(Source: steelbison)

historicaltimes:

A foot guard passes out as Queen Elizabeth II rides past during the trooping the colour parade in June, 1970, London -

Reblogged from historicaltimes

historicaltimes:

A foot guard passes out as Queen Elizabeth II rides past during the trooping the colour parade in June, 1970, London -